Working beyond boundaries. Collaboration as a key to natural areas management.

Workshops & Symposia

This year we will offer four Workshops, two on Monday and two on Thursday during conference week.

Workshops

WK-1 Managing Natural Risk: Increasing Resiliency to Drought, Wildlife and Climate Change on Private Lands

ALL DAY WORKSHOP; 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Lunch is not provided, but we will break at noon for an hour. The Hilton has both a coffee shop and restaurant and there are restaurants within walking distance.

Private forests, farms and ranches are increasingly vulnerable to a broad range of impacts from climate change, drought and wildfires. The risks of these unpredictable but potentially catastrophic events are profound. Building resilience on these lands can be accomplished through intentional site-specific design and management techniques. This workshop combines permaculture design principles and sustainable biomass management using affordable techniques to reduce the intensity of wildfires and drought on forest, brush, grass- and crop-lands – while enhancing ecosystem services. These techniques also improve soil quality, moisture conservation, wildlife habitat, water quality and income streams. Relying on a combination of traditional ecological and scientific practices and knowledge, practical, applicable solutions will be shared. We will also examine emerging climate change-related markets for carbon, nutrients and value-add opportunities from implemented practices.

Course includes: PPT (good ones not word barrages!) based lecture, open discussion, design charrettes, virtual video field tours, tech transfer and resource sheets

This proposal relates to the overarching conference themes of working across boundaries as the relationship between what happens on private lands and public lands is critical. Collaboration is at the heart of this effort as private landowners enhance their properties, they become contagion and leaders for changes throughout their watersheds. Most actions private landowners undertake to build resilience on their properties requires coordination and collaboration with a host of other agencies and organizations to define and support their work.

This workshop specifically addresses conservation across boundaries, the wildland/urban interface, the value of healthy land to water resources, the importance of natural areas, ecosystem services and working landscapes and forest and range management. Agency personnel sometimes lack of practical, personal experience in the areas in which they lead. This workshop can help them ground themselves in the realities of private landowners and help them learn how to work effectively across public/private boundaries. This is an excellent train-the-trainer opportunity as well.

Limit 25. Open to all.

Date
Monday, Oct 9, 2017

Time
9:00 am – 6:00 pm

Organizer
Gloria Flora and Kelsey Crane

WK-2 Social Science in the Wildlife/Urban Interface: Human Dimensions Research Application at the Local Land Management Level

The City of Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks (OSMP) is an urban-proximate open space situated in the Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) of the Front Range. Encompassing just over 45,000 acres with 155 miles of designated trails, OSMP provides a diverse array of ecological services and recreational opportunities to the surrounding area. However, with an annual visitation of more than five million visits, empirically understanding visitation dynamics and experiences is becoming essential to successfully managing open space in the WUI. This workshop will introduce participants to some of the scientific theories and methods employed by the OSMP Human Dimensions Program to empirically quantify visitation on open space. In particular, the workshop will focus on methods for quantifying visitation dynamics using automated trail counters and gathering visitor characteristics using on-site intercept surveys. Specific topics to be covered are: sample design, methods selection, implementation/operationalization, and analysis. Participants are invited to bring trail maps of their areas, for use during group activities and discussions.

Limit 25. Workshop caters specifically to the core working group from FS, NRCS, Colorado ecologists, and GIS specialists, but is open to all participants.

Date
Monday, Oct 9, 2017

Time
9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Organizer
Deonne R. VanderWoude, City of Boulder Open Space and Colin R. Leslie, Mountain Parks Human Dimensions Program

WK-3 Ecological Restoration Considerations in Purpose Specific Seed Mix Design

Pollinators, ecological restoration, erosion control, soil health, and weed control may be among the natural resource conservation purposes you are considering in your planning of projects to restore rare and declining habitat, establish conservation cover, or improve the productivity of rangeland. Applicable Objective: Objective 2.3: Plant establishment, species interactions, and ecosystem restoration

This workshop integrates basic ecological restoration concepts with planning resources to help you develop seed mixes suitable for your site specific site conditions and conservation purposes. Available information and tools to assist the practitioner will be reviewed and highlighted while considering the ecological processes of plant community development. The latest information related to ecological site descriptions, integrated pest management strategies, historic reference sites, Web Soil Survey, virtual herbarium sites, target plant communities, and other site specific considerations and evaluation criteria will be utilized and reviewed as available resources for developing purpose specific and site specific seed mixes. Considerations for locally adapted seed resources, seed quality, as well as, released cultivars will be discussed and reviewed.
In the workshop setting, participants will design sample pollinator friendly seed mixes to gain experience with the concepts presented.

Limit 25. Open to all.

Date
Thursday, Oct 12, 2017

Time
9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Organizer
Christine Taliga, USDA NRCS Revegetation Technical Advisor to the National Park Service